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Sea Vegetables
PAIGE MAYFIELD

It may sound strange, but people very seldom use common sense when it comes to their food choices. Most are hedonistic about cravings, healthy only when it’s convenient and skeptical about wellness solutions that don’t include their favorite junk foods. Even those of us who are health-minded often overlook the most obvious and truly nourishing food Earth has to offer: sea plants.

The ocean contains all of the minerals found in the blood and enriches its easily assimilated plant bodies with all that we need. As a result, these seaweeds and algaes can provide 20% more minerals than land plants. They’re dense with vitamins and abundantly available for the taking.

While soil is easily depleted of nutrients and often—to our detriment—chemically “enriched” with fertilizers, the ocean is forever fruitful in essential nutrients. And because the majority of our world is covered with oceans, there is more than enough to feed the rapidly growing world population.

Sea plants’ unique nutritional composition makes them extremely detoxifying and healing. They leach heavy metals from the body and are known to reduce body masses such as tumors and alkalize the blood. These purification characteristics also contribute to skin and hair health, making sea vegetables a truly beautifying food.

Seaweeds are extremely high in calcium, protein, iron and iodine, making them an ideal food, especially for those with plant-based diets.

Here are some simple ways to incorporate more of these miraculous vegetables into your diet:

1. Use un-roasted nori sheets as wraps for vegetable sandwiches.

2. Add 1 tablespoon of raw spirulina to your smoothies.

3. Use dulse flakes as seasoning.

4. Add wakame or hijaki to soups, dips and casseroles.

5. Use chewable chlorella tablets are a supplement.

photo credits: randy p. martin